Christmas, Uncategorized

Have Yourself an Eco Little Christmas

When I was little, Christmas morning – particularly unwrapping gifts – was a very orderly affair. We were under orders to carefully peel off the sellotape and leave the paper intact so that my mum could iron it and reuse it the following year.

How times have changed. These days more gifts are given, all are individually wrapped, and the paper is ripped off. The crumpled shred of torn paper are scrunched up and thrown on the wood-burner. After all, it can’t be recycled – the paper is full of metallics and plastics for the sheen, and to prevent accidental ripping before the Big Day.

This bothers me. Such a waste of natural resources, chemical printing processes, transport (to get the paper from the factories to the shops), our money, and our time in cutting, sticking and wrapping. And for what? To make a nice display under the Christmas tree, and keep the contents an eagerly anticipated secret.

There has to be a better way.

And now there is! Utterly reusable, these Christmas wrap gift bags will make your gifts look lovely under the tree and save you so much time and money. Take a look at the full range here.

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cork, Uncategorized

Cork – a “vegan leather”

This post is borrowed (with permission) from Toni of The Little British Fabric Shop, and explains all about cork – the fabric that really does grow on trees!

Hi, my name is Toni and I live in Wiltshire in England.  I am the owner of The Little British Fabric Shop where I sell quilting cottons and cork fabric through my websiteand in my spare time I love to make bags and purses (amongst other things!) which I sell through Facebook or at local craft fairs. You can also follow me on Instagram (and very occasionally twitter) @tlbfs

What is cork fabric?

Cork fabric, also known as cork leather or vegan leather, is produced from thin cork shavings which are obtained directly from the bark of the cork oak tree. The cork shavings are backed typically with a combination of cotton, polyester and polyurethane and is very soft to the touch and very flexible.

When the bark of the cork oak tree is removed a new layer of cork re-grows, making it a renewable resource. When harvested at regular intervals the trees can thrive for centuries.  This is what makes the cork oak unique as it is the only tree that survives even after its bark had been stripped from it.  The bark can develop considerable thickness and can be harvested every 7 to ten years.

So it’s renewable which means it’s sustainable, and there are no harmful chemicals involved in the production of cork fabric which means it is also environmentally and eco-friendly.

But that’s not all!  Cork fabric is hypoallergenic because it doesn’t absorb dust, so it helps to protect against allergies and does not pose a risk to asthma sufferers. It is anti-fungal which means it will not go mouldy when it gets damp. It is waterproof, stain resistant and easily cleaned. And it is as durable as leather, yet as versatile as fabric which I think is what makes it such a popular choice for makers of bags and apparel. Finally, it is seen as an animal friendly alternative to leather and so is very popular as a vegan leather substitute – you will find that most manufacturers of cork and cork apparel will carry the ‘PETA Approved’ logo (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals).

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